I’m a writer; I can float for hours on a word like “amethyst” or “broom” or the way so many words sound like what they are: “earth” so firm and basic, “air” so light, like a breath. You can’t imagine them the other way around: She plunged her hands into the rich brown air. Sometimes I think I would like to be a word - not a big important word, like “love” or “truth,” just a small ordinary word, like “orange” or “inkstain” or “so,” a word that people use so often and so unthinkingly that its specialness has all been worn away, like the roughness on a pebble in a creek bed, but that has a solid heft when you pick it up, and if you hold it to the light at just the right angle you can glimpse the spark at its core. — Katha Pollitt
asker

andeventhis asked: I could google, but you're so much more fun!

Infer vs. Imply
&
Continual vs. Continuous

Please and thank you. :)

Infer v. Imply: It’s all about the source. Both words refer to a veiled conclusion based on subtle information given. Someone who draws their own conclusion based on subtle information is inferring. The person who seems to say/mean something without explicitly stating the conclusion is implying. If I tell you that dress doesn’t look very modest, I am implying that you look like a whore, and you have to infer what I meant.

Continual v. Continuous: Think of the first one like annual, because continual means that XYZ is repeating, but there are gaps in time where XYZ isn’t happening. Continuous ABC is ongoing without stopping. Students go to school continually, because they have to return to classrooms. Inmates are in prison continuously, because they don’t go home.

fuckyeahgrammarquestions:

I just really like this word, even if it’s not English at all.

fuckyeahgrammarquestions:

I just really like this word, even if it’s not English at all.